Heart Valve Disease Symptoms And Treatment

Heart valve disease can affect any of the valves in the heart. The heart valves have flaps for opening and closing with each heartbeat, allowing blood to flow through the heart of the upper and lower chambers and the rest of the body.

The heart has four valves :

    1. Tricuspid valve located between the right atrium and the right ventricle
    2. Pulmonary valve located between the right atrium and the pulmonary artery
    3. Mitral valve, which is located between the left atrium, and left ventricle
    4. Aortic valve between the left ventricle and the aorta

Blood flows from the right and left atria across the tricuspid and mitral valve, allowing the blood to flow into the right and left ventricles. These valves then close the blood flowing back into the atria. Once the heart chambers are filled with blood, they begin to contract, forcing the lung and aortic valves to open. Blood then flows into the pulmonary artery and the aorta. The pulmonary artery carries oxygenated blood from the heart to the lungs and the aorta, the body’s largest artery, is responsible for carrying oxygen-rich blood to the rest of the body.

Basically, the heart valves work by making sure that blood flows in the forward direction and does not secure or leaks. If an individual has a valvular disease, the valve will not be able to do this job properly. This can be caused by regurgitation, stenosis or a combination of both.

Some individuals may experience no symptoms while other disorders such as strokes, heart attacks and thrombosis occur when the heart valve disease is left untreated.

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Valvular heart disease

Mitral valve prolapse

This can also be called floppy valve syndrome, click marbles syndrome, balloon mitral valve or Barlow syndrome. It occurs when the mitral valve does not close properly, sometimes causing blood to flow back into the left atrium.

Most people with mitral valve prolapse do not require symptoms and no treatment as a result. However, symptoms such as palpitations, shortness of breath, chest pain, fatigue and coughing may indicate that treatment is necessary.

The treatment includes surgery to repair or replace the mitral valve.

Bicuspid aortic veins

This happens when a person is born with an aortic valve that has two valves instead of the usual three. In very severe cases, symptoms of this type of disorder are present at birth. However, some people may know that they have decades to go without this type of disorder. The valve is usually able to work for years without causing any symptoms, so most people with premolar aortic valve disease are usually diagnosed only in adulthood. According to the Cleveland Clinic, 80 percent of people with this form of heart valve disease will be operated to repair or replace the valve, which usually happens when they are in their 30s or 40s.

Symptoms include shortness of breath during exercise, chest pain and dizziness or fainting. Most people are able to successfully repair their aortic valve with surgery.

Valvular

This occurs when a valve is unable to fully open, which means that insufficient blood is able to flow through the valve. This can affect one of the heart valves, and can be caused by the heart valve thickening or stiffening.

Symptoms can include chest pain, shortness of breath, tiredness, dizziness and fainting. Some people do not need treatment. Other people may use valvuloplasty, which uses a balloon to inflate the valve or flap replacement surgery.

Valve insufficiency

This can also be called a “leaky valve” and occurs when one of the heart valves does not close properly, causing the blood to flow backwards. Symptoms include shortness of breath, coughing, tiredness, palpitations, drowsiness and swelling of the feet and ankles.

The effects of valve failure vary from person to person. Some people need to monitor their condition. Others may need prescribed medications to prevent fluid retention while others have valve repair or replacement.

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Causes Of Valvular Heart Disease

There are a number of causes of various heart valve diseases. Causes can be :

    • birth defect
    • Endocarditis inflammation of the heart tissue
    • Rheumatic fever inflammatory disease brought on after group A streptococcal infection
    • Age-related changes, such as calcification
    • Heart attack
    • coronary artery disease
    • Cardiomyopathy degenerative changes in the heart muscle
    • Syphilis is a relatively rare sexually transmitted infection
    • hypertension
    • Aortic aneurysms abnormal swelling or protrusion of the aorta
    • Atherosclerosis Arteriosclerosis
    • myxomatous degeneration weakening of the connective tissue in the mitral valve
    • Lupus a chronic autoimmune disease,

Heart Valve Disease Symptoms

Symptoms of heart valve disorders according to the severity of the disease. Usually, the onset of symptoms indicates that the disorder is affecting blood flow. Many people with mild or moderate valvular heart disease experience no symptoms. However, symptoms can be :

    • shortness of breath
    • palpitation
    • fatigue
    • Chest pain
    • Dizziness and fainting
    • a headache
    • to cough
    • Water retention or swelling in the lower extremities and abdomen
    • Pulmonary edema or excess fluid in the lungs
How are heart valve diseases diagnosed?

If you have symptoms of heart valve disease, your doctor will start by listening to the heart using a stethoscope. He or she will listen for any heart rate abnormalities that might indicate a problem with the heart valves. Your doctor may also listen to the lungs to determine if there is fluid retention as well as check your body for signs of water retention, both symptoms of heart valve problems.

Other tests that can diagnose for valvular heart disease include :

    • Electrocardiogram is a test that shows the electrical activity of the heart. This test is used to check arrhythmia.
    • Echocardiography uses sound waves to create an image of the heart valves and chambers.
    • Cardiac catheterization is another test to diagnose valve disorders. This test uses a thin tube or catheter with a camera to take pictures of the heart and blood vessels. This can help to determine with your doctor the nature and severity of the disease valve.
    • A chest x-ray can be ordered to take a picture of your heart. This may be your doctor if your heart is enlarged.

Magnetic resonance imaging can create a more detailed picture of the heart. This can help to confirm a diagnosis and help your doctor determine how best to treat your valve disorder.

A stress test can also be used to determine how the symptoms are affected by physical exertion. The information from the stress test can help your doctor determine the severity of your condition.

Treatment Options

Treatments for heart valve disorders depend on the severity of the disease and symptoms. Most doctors recommend starting with conservative treatment. This includes :

    • consistent medical supervision
    • smoking
    • a healthy diet

Medications that are usually prescribed are :

    • Beta blocker and calcium channel blocker to help control heart rate and blood flow
    • Reduce diuretics for fluid retention
    • vasodilating drugs that open or dilate the blood vessels

Surgery may be needed if the symptoms increase in severity. This can be used to repair heart valves with patient’s own tissues or heart valve replacement with animal valves, donated valves, mechanical or valves.

Valvuloplasty can also treat the stenosis. A small balloon inserted into the heart, where it is slightly puffed up. The inflation will be the size of the opening in the valve and then the balloon is removed.

Healthy Diet, Vitamins And Minerals That Help With Depression

Our diet has a direct effect on our immune system and thus makes a significant contribution to our health. If your blood sugar levels fluctuate because you are not eating well, you may experience sleep disturbances, imbalances, fatigue, and pain. Therefore, eat light meals to make you feel lighter and cleanse your body of harmful substances. This also includes a lot to drink (but no alcohol). Recommended are tea (no green or black tea, but herbal tea, fruit tea, lavender or lemon balm tea), fruit juice and still water (because carbon dioxide can also make you nervous!) Do yourself more often something good, and eat above all what You like it. Spend your money on being properly pampered on a regular basis and remember: Eating is also a “pleasure”!

So, eat happily and avoid everything that makes you unhappy! Here is my list of “Do’s & Dont’s” in the diet.

Avoid smoking, alcohol and drugs as much as possible.

    • Smoke
      Smoking is not only unhealthy, but has been shown to aggravate anxiety and panic attacks. Cigarettes make you nervous immediately, instead of relaxing you.
    • Alcohol
      Alcohol relaxes you for a short time, but after just a few hours, it makes you feel depressed, sad, and impotent. This also applies and especially if you are taking medication – your liver has enough to do with it!
    • Drugs
      Drugs strain your organism, and everything that strains your organism is depressive. Unfortunately, for space reasons, we can not devote ourselves to the harmful effects of individual drugs. So, please keep your hands off it, because drugs will not bring you on, but throw you back!
    • Coffee
      For a cup a day is certainly no objection, but you should keep in mind that coffee, black and partly green tea as well as tobacco consumption cause fears and panic or can increase in no time. Too much coffee causes anxiety, nausea, dizzy spells and a decline in performance.
    • Allergens and pollutants
      Spicy cleaners, fumes, etc. are a major drain on your immune system and additionally weaken you. Food allergens (lactose, etc.) can also trigger depression.

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These vitamins and minerals are good for depression: –

    • Vitamins in fish, fruits & vegetables and dairy products

Note in advance: Please avoid – if your doctor has not recommended otherwise – if possible, vitamin supplements and other supplements, because they often contain substances that burden your body additionally, and because they are usually not as healthy as natural foods. Regular intake of supplements can even increase mortality, as demonstrated by a large-scale study with 230,000 participants. So eat something healthy instead of swallowing pills!

    • B-vitamins
      Dopamine acts directly on the reward system and is crucial for our wellbeing. Since the synthesis of dopamine is directly via the B vitamins (especially B12), you should eat a lot of healthy fish and dairy products (with lactose intolerance, of course, only lactose-free products). Fish oil has many B vitamins and raises the level of omega-3 fatty acids; Alone, this has a long-term mood-enhancing effect. Incidentally, you can also find vegan supplements in the pharmacy.
    • Vitamin B6
      This vitamin B promotes serotonin synthesis (good for mood) and is mainly found in cereals and shellfish.
    • Vitamin B3
      Vitamin B3 regenerates the skin, muscles, nerves and DNA. It is mainly found in poultry, game, fish, mushrooms, dairy products and eggs. Vegans can meet their needs. a. cover peanuts, dates, mushrooms, dried apricots and legumes.
    • Vitamin B2
      Vitamin B2 is crucial for our growth and energy metabolism. Some antidepressants affect the absorption of vitamin B2, which can lead to deficiency symptoms! Therefore, eat plenty of dairy products, fish, meat, eggs and whole grains, and get regular medical check-ups.
    • Folic acid (vitamin B9)
      Also, a deficiency of folic acid is associated with depression. Folic acid is present in the following foods: wheat germ, beef, veal and chicken liver, beans, yeast, wholegrain bread, spinach, kale and asparagus, nuts, fruit, fish and egg yolk.
    • Vitamin E

This vital vitamin not only strengthens the immune system and helps to fight off pollutants but is also important for the nerves. Studies have shown that people with depression often have too low a vitamin E (tocopherol) level. Such a lack of vitamin E causes, among other things, impaired concentration, decreased performance, tiredness and increased irritability. Vitamin E is found mainly in wheat germ oil, sunflower oil and virgin olive oil. Please store these oils as light protected as possible and do not overheat them, just warm them up.

    • Vitamin A (Retinol)
      This vitamin is important not only for eyesight, skin, bones and tissues, but also for our nervous system and metabolism. Stress and the use of certain sleeping pills can lower the vitamin A level. Incidentally, vitamin A is not only found in carrots and other fruits and vegetables, but also in fish, liver, butter, egg yolks and dairy products. Always eat some fat with vitamin-rich fruits and vegetables, because otherwise the body can not absorb the good ingredients. Just nibbling dry carrots makes about as much sense in vitamin technology as chewing on a pencil end.
    • Vitamin C
      This vitamin is always important, which is why we are no longer concerned with it.
    • Vitamin D (cholecalciferol)
      Surely you also know the term “winter depression”. Vitamin D is mainly formed by the sunlight and has a great influence on our well-being. It regulates calcium levels and is important for bone formation. Studies have shown that vitamin D levels are often lower in older people with depression than in people without depression. Go out into the sun as often as possible and occasionally eat greasy fish such as herring, sprat, sardine and anchovy, salmon, mackerel, tuna and carp.

A lack of vitamin D can be caused among other things by the following factors:

    1. too low a consumption of dairy products,
    2. excessive consumption of alcohol and tobacco and
    3. too little (direct) sunlight (especially in the elderly).

Some studies have found a link between low vitamin D levels and dysphoria (depression and “bad mood”). Therefore, an additional (precisely dosed by the doctor!) Administration of vitamin D in depression is recommended by some researchers. Vitamin D is very important for the regulation of calcium levels in the blood and for bone formation. Vitamin D deficiency is therefore associated with calcium deficiency, and this in turn with osteoporosis and muscle cramps. However, administration of excessive levels of calcium and vitamin D seems to be associated with brain injury in some elderly people. Too much vitamin D and calcium are also associated with brain calcification and dementia. Therefore, here again applies: Only the right level is healthy. Always talk to your doctor before taking any vitamin supplements and minerals!

Even through sleep deprivation and light therapy, vitamin D deficiency can be resolved to a degree. Read more in our chapter “Sleep”.

    • Sugar and carbohydrates
      These vital substances increase tryptophan uptake in the brain and thereby raise serotonin levels, which has a positive effect on well-being. On the other hand, too much sugar and carbohydrates not only make you fat, but also lead to adrenaline in the long term, which in turn damages the cells and can even lead to the development of cancer.
    • Magnesium
      Magnesium deficiency can lead to depression, as evidenced by large-scale studies. Always make sure you have sufficient magnesium intake. Magnesium is contained in amounts above 100mg per 100g, especially in whole grains, wheat bran, oatmeal, oatmeal, whole rice, green vegetables, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, nuts, beans and peas.
    • Zinc
      Zinc has been shown to be antidepressant and should therefore always be present in sufficient quantities. It is found mainly in animal products (mainly in muscle meat, offal, fish and cheese). Vegans should eat a lot of whole grains, soybeans and peanuts. Sourdough bread improves the availability of zinc. Incidentally, postpartum depression is also often due to zinc deficiency.
    • Chrome
      A double-blind, placebo-controlled study involving 113 patients with atypical depression has shown that daily doses of Chromium Picolinate were significantly antidepressant in those patients who had high cravings for carbohydrates. Chromium is present in higher quantities in liver, kidneys and muscle meat, cheese and whole grains, oysters, pepper, nuts and brown sugar (molasses).

Environmental toxins and immunocompromising conditions
Although this note is not necessarily in our chapter “nutrition”, but is important: Environmental toxins such as exhaust gases, solvents, etc. damage the immune system and can trigger depression. Incidentally, inflammation, infections and immunodeficiency diseases are also depressing.

Nutrition In Osteoarthritis: Alleviate Discomfort Through Nutrition

Osteoarthritis is not just affecting the elderly – though the likelihood of damaged joints carting increases with age. In addition to a hereditary predisposition, there are also factors such as an unhealthy lifestyle and poor diet, which have made osteoarthritis a widespread disease. It is still not possible to cure osteoarthritis – even a complete change of diet can not restore the destroyed cartilage – but the diet of arthritis plays an important role.

Osteoarthritis: Obesity is a risk factor

Those who are overweight are at risk of developing osteoarthritis. Obesity is a burden on the joints and joint wear is accelerated even faster. Even the osteoarthritis symptoms of non-bearing joints diminish in weight loss.

In addition, experts suspect a connection between fat reduction and the decline of inflammatory substances that are released in the body. Such inflammatory agents are leptin, resistin and adiponectin; they are formed in the fat cells. Fewer body fat can thus be less inflammatory in the joints leading to osteoarthritis.

Healthy weight loss through balanced nutrition and appropriate sports (important in osteoarthritis, so that the joints do not stiffen completely) is a first step in the treatment of osteoarthritis.

 

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Relieve arthrosis through a healthy diet

Although there is no diet that can completely eliminate the discomfort of osteoarthritis. But the diet has a positive effect on the course of osteoarthritis and can even prevent further development.

Especially recommended are foods such as:

    • fruit
    • salads
    • vegetables
    • potatoes
    • brown rice
    • Spelt
    • Skimmed milk products
    • Coldwater fish such as squid, trout, cod, halibut or even oysters
Recommended foods for osteoarthritis

Millet is said to contribute to the regeneration of cartilage. In addition, you should only use cold-pressed oils such as olive oil, walnut oil, sesame oil, thistle oil or rapeseed oil.

For deacidification are basic herbal tea or tea blends of fennel, licorice, caraway, anise or maize beard. Alternatively, pharmacies sell finished powder from different manufacturers. Green tea has an anti-inflammatory effect that can alleviate osteoarthritis pain. This effect is further enhanced by an addition of lemon.

Since free radicals are also suspected of being involved in the inflammatory processes of osteoarthritis, a vitamin A, vitamin E and vitamin C-containing diet is recommended. Selenium and copper should not be missing.

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Spices and herbs for osteoarthritis

Against every harm, a herb has grown! People who suffer from osteoarthritis mainly have to deal with the pain in the joints caused by the inflammation. However, nature has many plants that are anti-inflammatory. You can refine your salad with varying herbal mixtures of turmeric, parsley, fennel, dill, anise, cumin, mint, chervil, oregano, rosemary, thyme, coriander, marjoram and ginger. Chilli and cinnamon are also in the spice rack of an osteoarthritis patient.

Do you like to drink cocoa? Then add milk (better still: water) and cocoa powder to honey, turmeric, chilli powder, black pepper and cinnamon. Similarly, the morning breakfast yoghurt can conjure a varied herbal yogurt. The omega-3 fatty fish dishes, consisting of mackerel or sardines, which should be consumed twice a week in osteoarthritis, can be wonderfully refined with the above herbs and spices.

Osteoarthritis: Avoid certain foods

Anyone who wants to achieve a long-term improvement in his osteoarthritis symptoms should permanently change his diet. Only those who consistently follow the above-described arthritis nutrition tips will be successful. In addition, however, some food must be dispensed with as completely as possible. This includes animal fat – especially pig is taboo, but beef should be enjoyed only in moderation.

Sausage, sweets and sugar, asparagus, nuts strawberries, red pepper and tomatoes are also moderately consumed. You should also avoid fatty fish, as well as cream, margarine, butter and egg yolks. Saturated and hydrogenated fats are also on the red list, as are coffee, alcohol and black tea. Citrus fruits should not be consumed too much.

Anyone who sins from time to time because the temptation of chocolate cake, pork knuckle or summer strawberries with cream was too big, should pay attention to a balancing amount of base-containing foods or drink a liter of base tea to protect against acidity.