COPD – Diet For Chronic Lung Diseases

COPD stands for chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases. It is popularly called the smoker’s lung, which often shows the typical “smoker’s cough”, with shortness of breath and expectoration. Although the majority of smokers are affected, the number of non-smokers affected has steadily increased for years. Proper nutrition can not only prevent COPD. It can also influence the course of the disease very positively in the presence of an existing illness and make life worth living again. You can finally breathe easier, the mucus dissolves and the coughing subsides.

The diet determines the course of the disease in COPD

A wrong diet is also increasingly mentioned in scientific circles as a contributory cause of chronic diseases. Because the type of diet determines significantly whether an existing chronic disease progresses and is getting worse or whether it can improve again.

This applies to a variety of ailments, whether it is depression, arthritis, psoriasis, high blood pressure, breast cancer, polyneuropathy, multiple sclerosis, psychosis or whatever.

First studies have long been published, which prove the importance of nutrition in COPD and asthma. The very fact that obesity is a significant risk factor for lung disease and overweight is usually the result of an unhealthy diet, shows that it is high time to change the diet, which usually automatically leads to a normalization of weight.

copd-diet-for-chronic-lung-diseases

Even some pulmonary specialists now advise a change in diet, so that it has long been appropriate reports on this experience:

Experience: Basic nutrition improves COPD

“My pulmonologist recommended a basic diet. I was skeptical at first. But if I consistently implement this diet, I can breathe easier, cough less and have significantly less mucus in my throat. I eat vegetables and low-acid fruits. I add a pinch of soda (sodium bicarbonate) to my drinking water and eat six small meals instead of the usual three large meals.

Some fish and poultry are allowed. Coffee, carbonated drinks, red meat, chocolate and fried are taboo. At first I was worried that I would lose weight, but I did not lose much weight and regained it in terms of muscle mass thanks to my sports program. My new diet has another advantage. I no longer need acid blockers for the stomach. However, as soon as I sin, I notice it immediately, I feel worse and I return with pleasure to my basic diet. ”

Of course, there are always feedbacks like this: “I had to quit smoking. If I can not eat all that, what I like, I have no more joy in life. “Here is a decision to make: to feel good and to enjoy the enjoyment of healthy food or sitting in the old mess stay and cough the soul out.

COPD risk decreases by one third with proper nutrition

We have already reported on a study published in February 2015 in the British Medical Journal. A full-bodied vegetable-rich diet had reduced COPD risk by a third in this study!

COPD is the acronym of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (English: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease). It is a group of different respiratory diseases, including chronic obstructive bronchitis and pulmonary emphysema.

COPD-related diseases are characterized by systemic (whole-body) inflammation, respiratory tract inflammation, pulmonary function disorders and shorter life expectancy. Main symptoms are cough, bronchitis, sputum and respiratory distress.

In 2015, 30,000 people died of COPD in Germany alone. By comparison, lung cancer had 45,000 in the same year. However, lung health can be very well influenced by the diet.

In COPD, a change in diet is an important part of the therapy!

In the journal Nutrients, a review of the Center for Asthma and Respiratory Diseases of the University of Newcastle, Australia, was published in March 2015. The study focused on the influence of diet on lung health and especially on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

The participating researchers wrote that although medical care in this area is progressing more and more, a change in diet should always be carried out as an adjunct. For example, the Mediterranean diet offers itself as it has a protective effect against respiratory diseases in epidemiological studies.

Mediterranean diet instead of typical western diet

In the Mediterranean diet, you eat the most natural foods possible, such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts and seeds, accompanied by occasional fish meals. Dairy products, meat and poultry are rare. The source of fat is olive oil, which automatically reduces the consumption of unhealthy fats.

By contrast, the typical Western diet (white flour, meat, dairy, sweets, fries, salty snacks, and sweet desserts) increases the risk of becoming a victim of respiratory disease (asthma, COPD, etc.), and children who like to eat fast foods are more likely to develop asthma , That’s no surprise, as even a single high-fat fast-food meal increases the inflammation of the respiratory tract.

Fruits and vegetables improve lung function values

Fruit and vegetables, on the other hand, contain plenty of nutrients, such as antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, fiber and phytochemicals. All these substances are known to have a very good effect on human health, and thus also on the lungs and respiratory tract. Children and adults are therefore less likely to suffer from respiratory illnesses when they are practicing a high-fruit and vegetable diet. Eating children, however, little vegetables, then you are more likely to develop asthma.

In adults, a study showed that increased fruit intake over two years increases the so-called FEV1, a lung function value that usually continues to decline in COPD. Another study found that years of low fruit intake caused a falling FEV1.

In two randomized controlled trials with COPD patients, the 12-week study showed that high fruit and vegetable intake did not alter FEV1 nor did it affect inflammatory or oxidative stress levels in the respiratory tract.

Apparently, the time frame was too short, because in a three-year study with 120 COPD sufferers, the lung function score in the higher fruit and vegetable intake group improved significantly compared to the low-fruit and low-vegetable control group, so it can be assumed that short-term fruit and vegetable cures make no sense, but rather a permanent change in diet is recommended.

Minerals in COPD

Also, a comprehensive mineral supply should be self-evident in COPD. In asthma, it is known that the increased intake of magnesium, calcium and potassium reduces the risk of illness.

Calcium

Calcium intake in particular seems to be more difficult in COPD patients, as a study showed. The subjects consumed enough calcium but had low calcium levels. However, this may also be due to a vitamin D deficiency, as vitamin D promotes calcium absorption from the intestine. If vitamin D is missing, calcium deficiency becomes more likely.

Magnesium

Since magnesium relaxes the muscles of the bronchi and overall improves the lung functions, a good supply of magnesium for respiratory diseases is also enormously important.

Selenium

In some studies, a selenium deficiency has also been shown to promote the development of lung diseases, so that this trace element could also be included in a holistic therapy of COPD – not least because selenium promotes the body’s ability to detoxify and thus protect the organism from harmful substances. which otherwise can damage the lungs in particular. What selenium preparations come into question and how they are dosed, we have explained here: selenium for detoxification

Fiber in COPD

On a fiber-rich diet, you usually pay attention only when the digestion causes problems. Also, to prevent diabetes or to lower the cholesterol level, dietary fiber is often eaten.

In lung diseases, however, one generally does not immediately think of oat bran, wholemeal bread and baobab. But you should. Because a study from January 2016 showed that the lungs with daily 20 grams of fiber were in much healthier condition than in humans who ate low fiber. Yes, in populations that eat high-fiber diets, only half as many suffer from respiratory ailments than those who prefer white-rot, meat, and dairy-all low-fiber foods.

Omega-3 fatty acids

Omega-3 fatty acids are among the polyunsaturated fatty acids with u. a. anti-inflammatory effect. They are usually offered as a dietary supplement in capsule form – either as fish oil or algae oil, but are also contained in numerous foods.

Fish consumption is often called ideal if you want to provide enough omega-3 fatty acids. For the lungs, fish consumption does not seem to offer a health guarantee, as previous study results are extremely mixed. They either showed that fish consumption is associated with an increased risk of lung disease, has no impact on lung health or can improve lung function.

However, further studies have shown that higher levels of DHA reduce COPD risk and lower COPD levels of inflammation and support disease recovery. Dietary supplementation with DHA-rich omega-3 supplements (eg algae capsules Opti3) would therefore be an important component of holistic therapy for COPD.

Vitamin D in COPD

With nutrition, vitamin D can rarely be taken in relevant amounts. It is therefore a special case, because it can be made by the body with the help of sunlight itself. For the sake of completeness and because of its importance, we call it here anyway.

Studies show a clear correlation between good vitamin D supply and lung health. Although the exact mechanisms of this compound are not yet known, there is every indication that it makes sense to exclude or remedy a vitamin D deficiency if you have a lung disease or want to prevent it. Because a corresponding deficiency increases the risk of developing COPD.

For example, it is known that respiratory infections in COPD are unfavorable and should be avoided because they accelerate the course of the disease. Vitamin D now strengthens the immune system and reduces the susceptibility to respiratory infections, as Zosky et al. Wrote in 2013 in Nutrients.

In fact, one study from 2005 and another from 2012 showed that the better their vitamin D status was, the better lung function in COPD patients. Incidentally, smoking prevents the protective effect of vitamin D (Uh, Park et al., 2012).

We have also reported here that unfavorable vitamin D status increases the risk of asthma and leads to more frequent seizures and increased cortisone use in asthmatics. Yes, a vitamin D deficiency in pregnancy interferes with the child’s lung development so that it is later exposed to a higher risk of lung disease.

How to determine a vitamin D deficiency and to remedy this with individually appropriate vitamin D doses, we have described in our article on the correct vitamin D intake.

Antioxidants and oxidative stress

As with any chronic disease, oxidative stress caused by free radicals also plays a key role in COPD and other lung diseases. Free radicals are produced in the lungs by cell reactions to air polluting particles (dust, smoke, chemicals, etc.). They further enhance the inflammatory processes that are already present in COPD.

However, the better the supply of antioxidants, the better the body can cope with oxidative stress. Because antioxidants neutralize free radicals and stop their destructive activities. The most important antioxidants in a healthy diet include vitamins C and E, flavonoids and carotenoids, all of which are especially abundant in fruits and vegetables, as well as in nuts, vegetable oils, cocoa and green tea.

The carotenoid lycopene, for example, has been shown to be beneficial in lung disease, as pulmonary functions in asthmatics and COPD patients were all the better the more lycopene-rich foods they consumed. Even with a dietary supplement with lycopene, there were improvements, as the substance can relieve inflammation in the airways.

We have already reported food for lung repair here. In addition to apples, tomatoes play the main role in this article as they help in the regeneration of lung tissue and inhibit its aging process.

Another carotenoid is called beta-cryptoxanthin. It is, for example, in oranges, tangerines, pumpkins, red peppers, kakis, carrots and dandelions. Also, this substance has a very good effect on the health of the lungs and protects the respiratory organs from the harmful effects of smoking, so that especially passive smokers or ex-smokers should resort to these foods. Initial studies in animals showed that beta-cryptoxanthin could contribute to their shrinkage in existing lung tumors.

Flavonoids

Flavonoids are also plant substances with u. a. Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic (histamine-inhibiting) effect and therefore extremely helpful for the sensitive respiratory tract. The administration of flavonoids improves bronchoconstriction (spasmodic constriction of the bronchi) and inflammation. The latter, thanks to the flavonoids, improve not only in the respiratory tract, but in the whole organism.

The flavonoids include 6 subspecies: flavones, flavonols, flavanones, isoflavones and flavanols. There is hardly any vegetable food that does not contain at least one of these flavonoid representatives. The best flavonoid sources are therefore: fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, dark chocolate, tea, herbs and spices.

Vitamin C in COPD

Another top-class antioxidant is the vitamin C. It also has anti-inflammatory and anti-asthmatic and anti-allergic. Although there are also inconsistent results here, sometimes the vitamin improves the lung functions, sometimes there is no effect of vitamin C intake. From a holistic point of view, these investigations should not unsettle. Because no doubt you should not rely solely on vitamin C, but integrate the vitamin with many other measures in a comprehensive concept.

In mice that were unable to produce vitamin C for genetic reasons, the administration of vitamin C protected against lung disease, reduced oxidative stress in the airways, and helped to regenerate damaged lung tissue.

A study from Taiwan found that COPD patients usually had a low-vitamin C diet and / or had lower vitamin C levels than healthy people. Conversely, a study of 7,000 adult volunteers showed that increasing vitamin C levels can protect against COPD.

A healthy diet is automatically high in vitamin C, but can be supplemented with natural vitamin C supplements, such as acerola powder, sea buckthorn juice or rosehip powder.

Vitamin E

Vitamin E works closely with vitamin C. If vitamin E neutralizes free radicals, it is initially disabled itself. Vitamin C can now revitalize vitamin E so that it can once again plunge into the fight against oxidative stress. Whatever illness one suffers from, both vitamins should be present in sufficient quantities.

A human study showed that vitamin E reduces inflammatory processes, improves pulmonary function and relieves breathing difficulties, but mostly only in those subjects who previously had low vitamin E levels. As is so often the case, taking vitamins does not help everyone, but only where there is a need.

Vitamin E reduces levels of oxidative stress in COPD patients. Since there is a heavy burden of oxidative stress activities, especially during a push, it is not surprising that in these phases the vitamin E levels are very low, as now much of this vitamin is consumed.

If the illness flares up, then at the latest now an increased supply of vitamin E should be considered. Vitamin E is also helpful as a preventative measure. With sustained good vitamin E supply, the risk of developing a chronic lung disease could be reduced by 10 percent. That sounds little. However, considering that vitamin E is ONLY one measure of many and every single measure contributes to reducing the risk, then overall, a very good protection comes about.

Vitamin E sources

Good sources of vitamin E are wheat germ oil, sunflower oil, almonds, hazelnuts, sunflower seeds, peanuts and moringa. The vitamin E requirement of an adult is about 15 mg per day, which alone would put in 1 tbsp wheat germ oil or 4 tbl sunflower oil.

For comparison: 1 tbsp of olive oil provides only 1.3 mg of vitamin E, but is preferable to sunflower oil and wheat germ oil because of the better fatty acid ratio (omega-3 / omega-6). Of course you can still use some of these oils from time to time, but not only and not daily in large quantities.

The need for vitamin E could, for example, be met as follows, with the particular amount of vitamin E present in parentheses. The sum is 17.3 mg of vitamin E. (The respective amount of consumption can of course be adjusted entirely to the personal energy requirement):

    • 20 g hazelnuts or almonds (5 mg)
    • 10 g sunflower seeds (2 mg)
    • 10 g Moring Powder (4 mg)
    • 100 g whole grain bread (1 mg)
    • 80g quinoa raw (1.1mg)
    • 30 g of oatmeal (0.4 mg)
    • 1 tbsp olive oil (1.3 mg)
    • 500 g of fruits and vegetables (average 0.5 mg of vitamin E per 100 g, makes 2.5 mg)

Healthy diet in COPD

Alone from this list you could now put together a very healthy diet for COPD. Because these foods provide not only vitamin E, but almost everything it needs to maintain lung health, restore or improve existing lung diseases: fiber, antioxidants, minerals, vitamins, carotenoids and flavonoids.

Of course, one supplements the nutritional plan with healthy sources of protein, nibbles dark chocolate (antioxidants in cocoa), drinks a cup of green tea from time to time and alternates again and again, so takes z. B. other nuts or kernels in between, other flakes, eats instead of quinoa whole grain rice, etc.

Only selenium, omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D are additionally taken as a dietary supplement. If you would like to take additional supplements, the following are available:

Dietary supplement in COPD

Suction. BCAA, three specific amino acids (leucine, isoleucine and valine) that help regulate protein metabolism, are particularly good at building muscle, promote fat-free weight gain in underweight and also increase blood oxygenation (which is reduced in COPD), In some cases COPD is recommended – especially if weight loss is imminent in the course of the disease.

Curcumin from turmeric and sulforaphane from z. B. Broccoli sprouts are considered in COPD in question. Both are powerful anti-oxidants with anti-inflammatory effects, which have proven to be beneficial in initial studies in COPD. Turmeric is therefore also an important ingredient of the drink for lung cleansing.

Healthy Diet, Vitamins And Minerals That Help With Depression

Our diet has a direct effect on our immune system and thus makes a significant contribution to our health. If your blood sugar levels fluctuate because you are not eating well, you may experience sleep disturbances, imbalances, fatigue, and pain. Therefore, eat light meals to make you feel lighter and cleanse your body of harmful substances. This also includes a lot to drink (but no alcohol). Recommended are tea (no green or black tea, but herbal tea, fruit tea, lavender or lemon balm tea), fruit juice and still water (because carbon dioxide can also make you nervous!) Do yourself more often something good, and eat above all what You like it. Spend your money on being properly pampered on a regular basis and remember: Eating is also a “pleasure”!

So, eat happily and avoid everything that makes you unhappy! Here is my list of “Do’s & Dont’s” in the diet.

Avoid smoking, alcohol and drugs as much as possible.

    • Smoke
      Smoking is not only unhealthy, but has been shown to aggravate anxiety and panic attacks. Cigarettes make you nervous immediately, instead of relaxing you.
    • Alcohol
      Alcohol relaxes you for a short time, but after just a few hours, it makes you feel depressed, sad, and impotent. This also applies and especially if you are taking medication – your liver has enough to do with it!
    • Drugs
      Drugs strain your organism, and everything that strains your organism is depressive. Unfortunately, for space reasons, we can not devote ourselves to the harmful effects of individual drugs. So, please keep your hands off it, because drugs will not bring you on, but throw you back!
    • Coffee
      For a cup a day is certainly no objection, but you should keep in mind that coffee, black and partly green tea as well as tobacco consumption cause fears and panic or can increase in no time. Too much coffee causes anxiety, nausea, dizzy spells and a decline in performance.
    • Allergens and pollutants
      Spicy cleaners, fumes, etc. are a major drain on your immune system and additionally weaken you. Food allergens (lactose, etc.) can also trigger depression.

vitamins-and-minerals-that-help-with-depression

These vitamins and minerals are good for depression: –

    • Vitamins in fish, fruits & vegetables and dairy products

Note in advance: Please avoid – if your doctor has not recommended otherwise – if possible, vitamin supplements and other supplements, because they often contain substances that burden your body additionally, and because they are usually not as healthy as natural foods. Regular intake of supplements can even increase mortality, as demonstrated by a large-scale study with 230,000 participants. So eat something healthy instead of swallowing pills!

    • B-vitamins
      Dopamine acts directly on the reward system and is crucial for our wellbeing. Since the synthesis of dopamine is directly via the B vitamins (especially B12), you should eat a lot of healthy fish and dairy products (with lactose intolerance, of course, only lactose-free products). Fish oil has many B vitamins and raises the level of omega-3 fatty acids; Alone, this has a long-term mood-enhancing effect. Incidentally, you can also find vegan supplements in the pharmacy.
    • Vitamin B6
      This vitamin B promotes serotonin synthesis (good for mood) and is mainly found in cereals and shellfish.
    • Vitamin B3
      Vitamin B3 regenerates the skin, muscles, nerves and DNA. It is mainly found in poultry, game, fish, mushrooms, dairy products and eggs. Vegans can meet their needs. a. cover peanuts, dates, mushrooms, dried apricots and legumes.
    • Vitamin B2
      Vitamin B2 is crucial for our growth and energy metabolism. Some antidepressants affect the absorption of vitamin B2, which can lead to deficiency symptoms! Therefore, eat plenty of dairy products, fish, meat, eggs and whole grains, and get regular medical check-ups.
    • Folic acid (vitamin B9)
      Also, a deficiency of folic acid is associated with depression. Folic acid is present in the following foods: wheat germ, beef, veal and chicken liver, beans, yeast, wholegrain bread, spinach, kale and asparagus, nuts, fruit, fish and egg yolk.
    • Vitamin E

This vital vitamin not only strengthens the immune system and helps to fight off pollutants but is also important for the nerves. Studies have shown that people with depression often have too low a vitamin E (tocopherol) level. Such a lack of vitamin E causes, among other things, impaired concentration, decreased performance, tiredness and increased irritability. Vitamin E is found mainly in wheat germ oil, sunflower oil and virgin olive oil. Please store these oils as light protected as possible and do not overheat them, just warm them up.

    • Vitamin A (Retinol)
      This vitamin is important not only for eyesight, skin, bones and tissues, but also for our nervous system and metabolism. Stress and the use of certain sleeping pills can lower the vitamin A level. Incidentally, vitamin A is not only found in carrots and other fruits and vegetables, but also in fish, liver, butter, egg yolks and dairy products. Always eat some fat with vitamin-rich fruits and vegetables, because otherwise the body can not absorb the good ingredients. Just nibbling dry carrots makes about as much sense in vitamin technology as chewing on a pencil end.
    • Vitamin C
      This vitamin is always important, which is why we are no longer concerned with it.
    • Vitamin D (cholecalciferol)
      Surely you also know the term “winter depression”. Vitamin D is mainly formed by the sunlight and has a great influence on our well-being. It regulates calcium levels and is important for bone formation. Studies have shown that vitamin D levels are often lower in older people with depression than in people without depression. Go out into the sun as often as possible and occasionally eat greasy fish such as herring, sprat, sardine and anchovy, salmon, mackerel, tuna and carp.

A lack of vitamin D can be caused among other things by the following factors:

    1. too low a consumption of dairy products,
    2. excessive consumption of alcohol and tobacco and
    3. too little (direct) sunlight (especially in the elderly).

Some studies have found a link between low vitamin D levels and dysphoria (depression and “bad mood”). Therefore, an additional (precisely dosed by the doctor!) Administration of vitamin D in depression is recommended by some researchers. Vitamin D is very important for the regulation of calcium levels in the blood and for bone formation. Vitamin D deficiency is therefore associated with calcium deficiency, and this in turn with osteoporosis and muscle cramps. However, administration of excessive levels of calcium and vitamin D seems to be associated with brain injury in some elderly people. Too much vitamin D and calcium are also associated with brain calcification and dementia. Therefore, here again applies: Only the right level is healthy. Always talk to your doctor before taking any vitamin supplements and minerals!

Even through sleep deprivation and light therapy, vitamin D deficiency can be resolved to a degree. Read more in our chapter “Sleep”.

    • Sugar and carbohydrates
      These vital substances increase tryptophan uptake in the brain and thereby raise serotonin levels, which has a positive effect on well-being. On the other hand, too much sugar and carbohydrates not only make you fat, but also lead to adrenaline in the long term, which in turn damages the cells and can even lead to the development of cancer.
    • Magnesium
      Magnesium deficiency can lead to depression, as evidenced by large-scale studies. Always make sure you have sufficient magnesium intake. Magnesium is contained in amounts above 100mg per 100g, especially in whole grains, wheat bran, oatmeal, oatmeal, whole rice, green vegetables, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, nuts, beans and peas.
    • Zinc
      Zinc has been shown to be antidepressant and should therefore always be present in sufficient quantities. It is found mainly in animal products (mainly in muscle meat, offal, fish and cheese). Vegans should eat a lot of whole grains, soybeans and peanuts. Sourdough bread improves the availability of zinc. Incidentally, postpartum depression is also often due to zinc deficiency.
    • Chrome
      A double-blind, placebo-controlled study involving 113 patients with atypical depression has shown that daily doses of Chromium Picolinate were significantly antidepressant in those patients who had high cravings for carbohydrates. Chromium is present in higher quantities in liver, kidneys and muscle meat, cheese and whole grains, oysters, pepper, nuts and brown sugar (molasses).

Environmental toxins and immunocompromising conditions
Although this note is not necessarily in our chapter “nutrition”, but is important: Environmental toxins such as exhaust gases, solvents, etc. damage the immune system and can trigger depression. Incidentally, inflammation, infections and immunodeficiency diseases are also depressing.

Depression, Burnout And Bipolar Disorder

Losses and stressful changes or challenges are part of life. They make us feel sad, lonely, depressed. Often, such a stressful situation can be sustained and processed. If not, then it comes to a depression. This differs from a current mood low: Who suffers from depression, is only limited resilient and everyday tasks can not be mastered.

Depression – and its special forms – can affect everyone, regardless of age, gender, occupation and personal circumstances. Those affected are not losers, not lazy or self-pitying, they suffer from a serious illness. If it is recognized, it is treatable in most cases. It is important to talk about depression.

How is depression manifested?

Depression usually begins slowly. This makes it so difficult to recognize. The main hallmarks are a persistent or recurring sad mood, the feeling of inner emptiness, thinking, concentration and sleep disorders. The resulting emotional, physical and mental fatigue can also make you irritable, angry and inwardly restless. Depression can lead to loss of appetite and significantly reduce or even reduce the craving for physical closeness and sexuality. Depressed people lose the joy and interest in life. Everyday tasks, work commitments, leisure activities, social contacts are increasingly neglected. The need for retreat becomes central, many affected people can hardly get out of the house, resp. to get out of bed and spend a lot of time sleeping. Also physical complaints can occur without professionals can determine a cause for it. Depression has many faces, different symptoms are different. Excessive alcohol, drug or drug use is partly a self-healing attempt to deal with depression or anxiety. 

Depression varies in severity

There are mild, moderate and severe depression. In mild depression, the expectations of the private and professional environment can usually be met, from the outside is often not apparent. In a moderate depression, it is already difficult. It increasingly comes to errors, unreliability, failures. Agreements and appointments are increasingly being canceled. In case of a severe depression, almost everything is neglected. Everyday tasks such as getting up, showering, going to the toilet, cooking, eating, cleaning, etc. are almost impossible. Social contacts are no longer maintained.

What is a burnout?

Burnout means burned out, overwhelmed, totally exhausted. These symptoms also correspond to those of diagnosed depression. Burnout, however, makes a difference in the cause. It is believed that fatigue is primarily due to persistent stress at work (even unpaid). It is therefore a work-related disorder that involves both additional workloads in gainful employment as well as in educational and family work and the care of demented parents. A burnout is also called exhaustion depression.

what-is-bipolar-depression

A special form: the bipolar disorder

There are people who go through depressive phases, but in addition they experience something completely different: phases in which they are doing extremely well. One speaks then of a bipolar affective disorder (= manic-depressive illness). In the manic phases, those affected do things that they would never otherwise do: spending money, for example, exceeding their financial resources enormously, or quitting the job overnight. At the same time, sleep is extremely reduced. People in mania lose their sense of reality, feel constrained by normal social boundaries and disregard them. Often it comes during the manic phase to a hospital admission.

The change from mania to depression is often sudden. Some sufferers have only one manic episode. In the majority, however, it comes to repetitions, often spread over several years. 

What helps with a depressive illness?

Mental illnesses are treatable. For most, a combination of psychotherapy, medication and family counseling is the most effective. In seasonal depressions, light therapies may promote recovery. In a bipolar disorder is often not a psychotherapy in the strict sense, but a coaching, which is very practice-oriented. The focus is on disease awareness and disease acceptance. During a burnout, relaxation procedures and mindfulness-based therapies have become established.

Source: Observer Guide “Quite Different” by Thomas Ihde-Scholl

 

 

No diagnoses on the internet :

Symptoms often occur in healthy people.

The description of conditions on the Internet sometimes causes people to feel that they have the disease they are describing, because some symptoms apply to them. Many symptoms can also occur in healthy people or be related to other diseases. If you suspect that you are suffering from the condition described above, you should definitely contact a competent specialist. Only this can make a correct diagnosis.