Glycemic Index Used To Measure Blood Sugar Levels

In one case, a high-carbohydrate diet can be just the right way to get overweight under control. Others seem to be exactly the opposite. Scientific studies underline this statement: the less fat and the more carbohydrates people ingest, the fatter and sicker they get! The reasons for this are complex: There are carbohydrates that get very quickly from the intestines into the bloodstream and cause a rise in blood sugar levels.

Influence Of Carbohydrates On Insulin Levels

Insulin – a hormone from the pancreas – now has to regulate the blood sugar level back into the normal range. If the blood sugar level rises sharply, there is an enormous activation of insulin and, as a result, a drop in blood sugar below the norm. This hypoglycemia manifests itself as tiredness and an increased appetite for sweet foods. If you give in to cravings and eat foods rich in carbohydrates, the blood sugar can again rise above the norm and cause further insulin activation. Accordingly, hypoglycemia and hypoglycemia alternate regularly with a corresponding release of insulin.

This is where the problem begins: a high-carbohydrate diet can be a cause of increased insulin levels. As medical research has shown, an excess of insulin means that the organism does not burn fats that it ingests with food, but instead increasingly stores it as fat reserves, while at the same time reducing fat loss. In short: high insulin levels can lead to weight gain. However, the influence of carbohydrate foods on this process varies. Some have the ability to raise blood sugar levels more than others.

Glycemic Index Used To Measure Blood Sugar Levels

The so-called glycemic index (GI) is used to assess which carbohydrates are “good” and which are “bad”. The GI is a measurement that tells you how much your blood sugar level rises after consuming a certain food. A low GI is below 40, a medium is 40-70 and a high one is above 80. The selection of carbohydrate sources with low and medium GI is advantageous, as these cause only slight fluctuations in blood sugar and insulin and thus disinhibit fat burning.

Glycemic Index

The Glycemic Index is a practical tool for diet planning for weight loss, but it should not be overstated. Studies show that there are strong intra- and inter-individual differences in the GI. Intra-individual differences mean that one and the same person can have different blood sugar levels depending on the time of day and previous physical activity. Early in the morning, there is typically a lower increase in blood sugar levels and thus insulin than in the evening, as the cells’ insulin sensitivity decreases over the course of the day. Exercise also leads to a lower increase in the level of glucose in the blood. This means that there can be differences of up to 30% in the GI for the same person and the same food.

It should also be borne in mind that when determining the glycemic index, the food was eaten in isolation and contained exactly 50 g of carbohydrates, which does not correspond to natural eating habits at all. Rather, our food consists of a combination of different foods, which can have a strong influence on the course of the blood sugar level. Combining carbohydrates with fat, protein, and/or fiber results in a slower or faster rise in blood glucose than with isolated administration.

In addition, there are foods with a relatively high GI, but due to their low carbohydrate content, they do not trigger any significant fluctuations in blood sugar. For example, to take in 50 g of carbohydrates by eating carrots with a high GI of 71, one would have to consume around 850 g of carrots. The actual effect on the blood sugar level and thus on the insulin release is correspondingly small with a normal portion of 100-150 g.

With regard to the insulin response, the glycemic index alone is of little informative value, since the insulin response is dependent on both the type and the number of carbohydrates supplied and is also influenced by other nutrients. In order to take this into account, the term “Glycemic Load” (GL) has recently been used, translated as glycemic load or glycemic load. The GL is calculated by dividing the glycemic index by 100 and multiplying the result by the number of carbohydrates consumed. Accordingly, z. B. with 5.3 the value for the glycemic load of 100 g carrots. Large portions of pasta, rice, potatoes, and pastries have a high glycemic load. Scientific studies show an increased risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disorders in a diet with high GL.

Typical Symptoms Of Sore Throat

Symptoms

The reddened lining of the throat, scratching and pain in the throat, difficulty swallowing, and fever are the typical symptoms of a sore throat. Often, as a sign of an alarming immune system, the lymph nodes in the lower jaw and neck are swollen. In the case of tonsillitis (the technical term is angina tonsillaris or tonsillitis), there are also swollen and reddened or even ulcerated tonsils. If the larynx or vocal cords are inflamed, there is also hoarseness.

A scratchy, swollen throat is often associated with a cold or flu. In many cases, there are also annoying swallowing difficulties and hoarseness. You can find out more about the causes and treatment of sore throats here.

It often begins with a scratchy throat or difficulty swallowing: sore throats announce themselves. Most often, a sore throat is a symptom of a cold, flu, or other respiratory infection. Typically, a sore throat will go away with the underlying viral infection. Antibiotics help if the cause of infection is bacterial, such as tonsillitis.

Causes

A sore throat can be a symptom of an isolated infection caused by a virus or bacteria. Most often, a sore throat is a symptom of a cold, flu, or other respiratory infection. The germs cause inflammation of the mucous membrane in the throat area. Depending on where the pathogens settle, a distinction is made between inflammation of the lining of the throat (pharyngitis), inflammation of the vocal cords or larynx (laryngitis), or tonsillitis or angina tonsillaris. Mixed forms also occur.

In addition to bacteria and viruses, sore throats can also be caused by overuse of the voice and irritation of the airways (for example from chemicals, tobacco smoke, or dust). Other diseases such as mumps, scarlet fever, or Pfeifferscher’s glandular fever also cause sore throats.

Sore throats also occur due to esophageal or stomach disorders. The backflow of stomach contents through the esophagus causes heartburn, which is often accompanied by a sore throat.

Sore Throat

Causes Of A Sore Throat At A Glance

    • Cold, flu, angina (tonsillitis)
    • Overuse of the voice by singing, shouting, talking for a long time
    • Irritation of the respiratory tract from chemicals, smoke, or dusty, dry air
    • other diseases, e.g. glandular fever, pseudocroup, mumps, scarlet fever
    • Heartburn from gastric acid reflux
    • very rarely malignant tumors in the throat area.

Treatment

Sore throats usually do not require medical attention. Exceptions: The symptoms are very severe, do not subside after a few days, there are breathing difficulties or there is a suspicion of tonsillitis or other diseases.

Treatment Of A Sore Throat At The Doctor

If a bacterial infection is causing a sore throat, your doctor will prescribe antibiotics to fight the bacteria that cause disease. Antibiotics do not help with viral infections. Here the symptoms can be alleviated with home remedies and over-the-counter medicines.

Home Remedies For A Sore Throat

The following home remedies have proven to be particularly effective for helping yourself with a sore throat.

    • drink a lot
    • keep warm, especially your throat and chest, but do not sweat
    • keep the room air moist in winter
    • Avoid irritants, do not smoke
    • Gargling or inhaling herbal ingredients from arnica, Icelandic moss, chamomile flowers, thyme, linden flowers or sage leaves.

Over-The-Counter Drugs For A Sore Throat

    • Disinfecting gargle solutions, mouth sprays, or lozenges with active ingredients such as hexetidine or cetylpyridinium chloride have anti-inflammatory effects.
    • In the case of slight reddening and pain, anti-inflammatory lozenges or rinsing solutions (e.g. chamomile or sage extracts for rinsing, tablets containing dexpanthenol for sucking) are effective.
    • Lozenges or sprays with superficial anesthetics help with pain and difficulty swallowing.
    • In the case of more severe pain, short-term anti-inflammatory pain pills for ingestion with acetylsalicylic acid, ibuprofen or paracetamol, which at the same time reduce fever, are useful.
    • The local application of antibiotics usually does not make sense.

Prevention

It is only possible to a limited extent to prevent a sore throat. Basically, the same recommendations apply that you can read under respiratory infections and colds.